Electronic Recyclers International Chairman Receives “Youth Pioneer Hall of Fame” Award

John S. Shegerian, Chairman and CEO of Electronic Recyclers International (ERI), the nation’s leading recycler of electronic waste, has been named to the “Youth Pioneer Hall of Fame” for his work inspiring others to become leaders and entrepreneurs. The award was presented last week by the Central California Adolescent Development Corp at their Youth Entrepreneur Trade Show at the Arte Americas Museum in Fresno.

Shegerian, an entrepreneur who has led several socially benevolent businesses to success, regularly speaks to young entrepreneurs and university students about the benefits and importance of sustainability in business and the benefits of building green businesses. He often gives young people inspirational tours of ERI, which is very much in touch with its “environmental DNA,” as demonstrated from its electric forklifts, recycled furniture, energy efficient lighting and other environmentally friendly aspects of the company.

“The Pioneer award is a noted recognition for contributing significantly to the advancement of youth entrepreneurs,” said Laneesha Senegal, Director of the Central California Adolescent Development Corp. “John Shegerian is truly an outstanding leader that is daily inspiring others to become leaders. His accomplishments provoke others to follow their own dreams.”

Shegerian joins esteemed company in the Hall of Fame, including Steve Geil of the Economic Development Corp., Pastor Shane Scott of St. Rest Baptist Church, radio personality Nicole Giordano, Keith Kelly of the Fresno West Coalition, Randall Cooper of the City of Fresno Parks & Recreation (Fresno Best Program) and Ken Blackwood of Score.

“It’s a great honor to be considered an inspiration to the up and coming entrepreneurs of today,” said Shegerian. “They are our next generation of business leaders and I believe it is critical we empower them with knowledge and education that leads them down a sustainable and successful path with their future endeavors. When I meet and address young adults and hear of some of their own goals and plans to be social entrepreneurs, I see tremendous promise.”